Monday, April 21, 2008

Fritillaria ussuriensis


This somber but lovely fritillary, with its hanging bells of maroon-purple, is often the first fritillary to bloom for us in the spring. It hails from eastern Russia, down through China and Korea. Liking moisture and partial shade, it grows nicely and multiplies rapidly for us, planted in an azalea bed.
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Comments:
Hmmm, that is a new one to me. I have one F. persica (may not be spelled correctly), and I was thrilled this spring when I saw there are now 2 bloom stalks. Happy me! It is a very strange color, difficult to describe: grayish purple? You are probably familiar with it.
 
That one does kind of have the same color as Persica and looks to be about the size of the Michaelovskis we have, but without the multi-colored 'lampshades' those have. We've fast become big Fritillaria fans over the past few years and hope to add some more in the fall. We're just hoping that our Persica Imperialis rubra come up this year, as they jumped the gun last year and were frozen, then disappeared last year. :-(
 
Barbee... this flower is very similar in color to persica; maybe just a little more red in it (maroon).

IVG... last year was very tough on the early fritillaries.

Don
 
What a beautiful color! Lovely little bloomer.
 
I have the F. uva vulpis which look like yours only with yellow lips. Same downfacing flower so it's rather inconspicous. I should have planted them next to a stone wall to enhance the flowers.
 
Ki... uva-ulpis is subtle to the point of being invisible; you're right about needing something to set it off. It's main attribute is that it multiplies like a rabbit (I guess that's good).
Don
 
Lovely little thing--nice to see the vicious winter left us some joys too!
 
These plants are very intriguing. Do you have the "speckled" variety? (I forget their name.)
 
Wanda... yeah; stuff underground did o.k.

shady... meleagris. Got lots of them popping up all over.

Don
 
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